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A Day Without Space: Considering National Security Implications September 8, 2011

Posted by George C. Marshall Institute in Uncategorized.
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On July 19, 2011 the Space Enterprise Council and the George C. Marshall Institute hosted A Day Without Space: Considering National Security Implications.

The Day Without Space series was launched in 2008 and strives to educate policy makers and the public about the growing importance of space to their daily lives and to U.S. economic and national security. Through a series of meetings, we discussed how the use of space for economic and military purposes has changed, considered why and how adversaries would seek to interdict or degrade U.S. space capabilities, and detailed the challenges confronting the U.S’s ability to respond or recover from attacks on its space assets.

Transcripts and related materials for the series are available at http://www.marshall.org/article.php?id=928.

The July 19 session was the second of four sessions planned for 2011. In this session, we focused on the use of space in meeting the national security missions of the United States. Speakers discussed how space is used and explained how and why prospective adversaries might interdict or disrupt the use of space.

Speakers included:

  • Lt. Gen. (ret.) Brian Arnold, Vice President, Space Strategy, Raytheon
  • Dr. Pete Hays, Associate Director, Eisenhower Center for Space Studies
  • Dr. John Sheldon, Director of the National Space Studies Center, School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, & Fellow, Marshall Institute
  • Dr. Steve Pierce, Director, Decision Support Directorate, SMD Future Warfare Center

Gen. Arnold’s slides are available here.

Dr. Sheldon’s slides are available here.

Dr. Hays’ slides are available here.

Dr. Pierce’s slides are available here.

A Day Without Space: The Role of Space in American Prosperity September 8, 2011

Posted by George C. Marshall Institute in Uncategorized.
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Space-based assets offer enormous benefits to the U.S. economy and national security. From television to telecommunications, financial transactions to farming, precision guidance to weather monitoring, space systems offer enormous value. Despite the growing recognition and appreciation for space, much work remains. Space programs have difficulties staying on time and on budget. Accessing space and operating there is expensive and far from the routine operations needed to make space activities affordable and accessible. The health and vitality of the industrial base servicing both commercial and military space needs is a continuing concern. Furthermore, U.S. adversaries recognize our dependency and the vulnerability of our space assets and therefore the incentives to interfere with, disrupt, or deny the use of satellites is high. And, decision makers are far from united in their views of how to respond to challenges to U.S. interests in space.

The Day Without Space series, launched by the George C. Marshall Institute and the Space Enterprise Council in 2008, strives to educate policy makers and the public about the growing importance of space to their daily lives and to U.S. economic and national security. Through a series of meetings, we discuss how the use of space for economic and military purposes has changed, consider why and how adversaries would seek to interdict or degrade U.S. space capabilities, and detail the challenges confronting the U.S’s ability to respond or recover from attacks on its space assets.

On March 11, 2011 we convened a panel discussion of The Role of Space in American Prosperity. Panelists included:

  • Lt. Gen. (ret.) Michael Hamel, Senior Vice President of Strategy and Development for Orbital Sciences, and formerly Commander of the Air Force Space Command’s Space and Missile Systems Center and Air Force Program Executive Officer for Space
  • Richard “Rich” Cooper, Partner with Catalyst Partners, LLC, and formerly, Business Liaison Director for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Private Sector Office (PSO)
  • Richard Dalbello, Vice President of Government Relations, Intelsat General Corp., and formerly Assistant Director for Aeronautics and Space in the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Video: A Day without Space: The Role of Space in American Prosperity

A summary of the event is available at http://www.marshall.org/pdf/materials/932.pdf

A Day Without Space: Synthesis Event September 8, 2011

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Space capabilities are woven deeply into the fabric of modern society. Commerce relies on them for the swift flow of information and transactions, and the national security arena depends on them for joint warfighting and protection of the homeland. They are key enablers of the precision warfare that not only reduces risk to American troops, but saves innocent lives by minimizing collateral damage. Space assets and the services they provide impact nearly every business sector, helping businesses become more efficient and productive.

What would happen if these assets were compromised? And, what can be done to enhance the security of U.S. assets in space?

The George Marshall Institute and the Space Enterprise Council of TechAmerica hosted the fourth and final installment of their “A Day Without Space” series on October 1, 2009 to discuss the economic security implications of losing access to space-borne assets and information and what steps might be taken to safeguard them.

KEYNOTE
: Representative Suzanne Kosmas (Florida)

SPEAKERS:

  • Captain Joe Burns– Managing Director, United Airlines (slides available here)
  • Jim Williams– Manager, Government and Military Accounts, NavCom Technology, Inc., A John Deere Company (slides available here)
  • Brig. Gen. John W. “Jay” Raymond– Director of Plans, Programs and Analyses, Air Force Space Command (slides available here)

A transcript of the event is available at http://www.marshall.org/pdf/materials/763.pdf

A Day Without Space: Economic Security Ramifications September 8, 2011

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The exploitation of space provides significant advantages to our economy. Space assets and the services they provide impact nearly every business sector, helping businesses become more efficient and productive. Space has clearly become ingrained into our economy. But, what would happen if these assets were compromised?

On July 28, the George Marshall Institute and the Space Enterprise Council of TechAmerica co-hosted the third installment of their “A Day Without Space” series to discuss the economic security implications of losing access to space-borne assets and information and what steps might be taken to safeguard them.

Keynote: Space and the U.S. Economy delivered by Scott Pace, George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute

Panel I: The Economic Impact of Space Based Assets

  • Andrea Maleter, Futron Corp.
  • Micah Walter-Range, Space Foundation

Panel II: How Business Uses Space

  • Charles Baker, DOC Office of Space Commercialization
  • Daniel Hurley, U.S. Department of Commerce, NTIA

A transcript of the event is available at http://www.marshall.org/pdf/materials/728.pdf

A Day without Space: National Security Ramifications September 8, 2011

Posted by George C. Marshall Institute in Uncategorized.
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Sponsored by the George C. Marshall Institute and the Space Enterprise Council of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

The exploitation of space systems offers significant advantages to the United States military. The integration of space assets with terrestrial power projection capabilities remains a uniquely American strength and provides a clear incentive for others to seek to disrupt access to those advantages by jamming information transmissions, denying use of on-orbit capabilities, or physically attacking American spacecraft or ground stations.

On February 12, the George Marshall Institute and the Space Enterprise Council of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce co-hosted the second installment of their “A Day Without Space” series to discuss the national security implications of losing access to space-borne assets and information and what steps might be taken to safeguard them.

Keynote: Contributions of Space to U.S. Security delivered by Gen. James E. Cartwright, Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

Panel: Responding to Space Challenges

  • Dana Johnson, NorthropGrumman Analysis Center
  • James Lewis, Center for Strategic and International Studies
  • Baker Spring, The Heritage Foundation

Panel: Organizing, Managing, and Acquiring Space Assets

  • Tommy Brazie, ITT Space Systems Division. Mr. Brazie’s slides are found here.
  • David Graham, Institute for Defense Analyses. Mr. Graham’s slides are found here.
  • Hal Hagemeier, National Security Space Office, Dept. of Defense.

A transcript of the event is available at http://www.marshall.org/pdf/materials/660.pdf

A Day Without Space: Economic and National Security Ramifications September 8, 2011

Posted by George C. Marshall Institute in Uncategorized.
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Space systems provide significant benefits to American commerce and national security. On October 16, 2008 the George Marshall Institute and the Space Enterprise Council of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce co-hosted a “A Day Without Space” to discuss the implications of losing access to space-borne assets and information for the U.S. economy and national security.

Speakers at the October 16th event included:

  • Ed Morris, Executive Director, Department of Commerce, Office of Space Commerce
  • Steven Anderson, Chief Scientist, Horizon Marine Inc.
  • Ron Hatch, Senior Scientist, John Deere/NavCom Technology
  • Major General James Armor (Ret. USAF)
  • Dr. John Sheldon, School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, Maxwell AFB
  • Dr. Pete Hays, Associate Director, Eisenhower Center for Space and Defense Studies, USAF Academy

A transcript of the event is available at http://www.marshall.org/pdf/materials/695.pdf